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The Golden Ratio

Experience Room “The Golden Ratio”

From Leonardo da Vinci to Roger Penrose, many artists and architects have created works to approximate the Golden Ratio. The Golden Ratio is considered to represent proportions most pleasing to human visual sensation but it is not exclusively limited to aesthetic beauty.

Human well-being responds to the rules of the Golden Ratio as well. When a lighting designer aims to create an atmosphere of dynamic light suitable for humans and capable of producing natural happiness, the use of the Golden Ratio can be an important asset.

The Experience Room “The Golden Ratio” will explore the question of how using these proportions as a design principle in light planning can help designers achieve better results.

The lighting design studio Consuline used the principles of the golden ration regularly in their work. For this room, they created a space to share their experiences, demonstrating how to use the ideas around the Golden Ratio when planning dynamic lighting.

Visitors will learn the guiding principles of the Golden Ratio and it’s relationship with architecture and the natural world. They will be able play and experiment with a toolkit of triangular elements to create patterns and forms.

The Experience Room is sponsored by

Photograph by Andrea Pugiotto

Francesco Iannone/IT & Serena Tellini/IT, Consuline

Francesco Iannone and Serena Tellini have designed the lighting for exhibitions, museums and churches plus a wide variety of other spaces around the world. Among their most famous projects are the lighting of the Formula 1 circuit in Shanghai, the lighting master plan for the Olympic Games in Beijing, and the lighting for the National Grand Theatre in Beijing. In the course of their career, they have illuminated major art exhibitions such as those of Giovanni Bellini, Titian and Lorenzo Lotto at the Scuderie del Quirinale in Rome, but also contemporary art exhibitions such as Tony Cragg in Lucca, or Egon Schiele in Lugano.

They have designed the lighting for city centres and cities in Italy and abroad, held lectures on lighting in many universities around the world (in Beijing, Nanjing, Bangkok, Mexico City, Santiago de Chile, Edinburgh, Lugano and Venice), and taught advanced courses in continuing education and for Masters degrees. Their projects have been published internationally.

In Monza, after redesigning the lighting for the historic town centre and the Museum and Treasure Chamber of the cathedral, Francesco and Serena worked on the lighting of the Zavattari Chapel and the Iron Crown, investigating the relationship between neuroscience and light. Based on research in this field, they were able to develop the Monza Method, first presented at PLDC 2009, and applied in workshops, museums, medical facilities and offices.

http://www.consuline.com